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Christina Applegate MS Diagnosis. and Selma Blair offered her support. Christina Reveals Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis. What is MS ? (Multiple sclerosis)

Christina Applegate ms diagnosis and Selma Blair offered her support in the replies

Christina Applegate has since been met with love from friends and fans alike. Selma Blair, with whom she starred alongside Cameron Diaz in the romantic comedy The Sweetest Thing, offered her support in the replies.

While ringing in her 50th birthday, the former star of ‘Married… With Children’ turns to her social media account to share a touching message for those who are also battling multiple sclerosis.

Christina Applegate celebrated her 50th birthday with a touching message after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

Taking to her social media account, the former “Married… with Children” star said she hoped to find “strength” amid her health scare.

On Thursday, November 25, the Jen Harding depicter on “Dead to Me” took to her Twitter account to share a message with her followers to mark her birthday and get candid with how she’s feeling on her special day. “Yup. I turned 50 today. And I have MS. It’s been a hard one,” she began.

“Sending so much love to all of you this day. Many are hurting today, and I am thinking of you. May we find that strength to lift our heads up,” Christina added. She then concluded her post, “Mine currently is on my pillow. But I try.”

Christina Applegate Marks 50th Birthday After MS Diagnosis: ‘May We Find That Strength’

“Sending so much love to all of you this day,” Christina Applegate wrote on Thanksgiving, which was also her 50th birthday, following her multiple sclerosis diagnosis

Christina Applegate is kicking off a new chapter after revealing her multiple sclerosis diagnosis earlier this year.

The Emmy Award winner celebrated her 50th birthday Thursday, which was also Thanksgiving, with an encouraging message for her 1.4 million Twitter followers. “Yup. I turned 50 today. And I have MS. It’s been a hard one,” she wrote.

“Sending so much love to all of you this day,” Applegate continued. “Many are hurting today, and I am thinking of you. May we find that strength to lift our heads up. Mine currently is on my pillow. But I try.”

She previously talked about her experience with MS on Twitter in August, a few months after she was diagnosed. “It’s been a strange journey. But I have been so supported by people that I know who also have this condition,” Applegate wrote at the time. “It’s been a tough road. But as we all know, the road keeps going. Unless some asshole blocks it.”

Applegate has since been met with love from friends and fans alike. Selma Blair, with whom she starred alongside Cameron Diaz in the 2002 romantic comedy The Sweetest Thing, offered her support in the replies.

“Loving you always. Always here. As are our kids. Beating us up with love,” Blair, 49, wrote, to which Applegate responded: “Love you sister. Our kids are so weird.”

Blair has also been open about her own MS diagnosis, which she revealed in 2018. Most recently, she detailed her journey with the disease in the discovery+ documentary Introducing, Selma Blair, which Applegate recommended on Twitter.

What is MS?

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common neurological disorders and causes of disability in young adults, affecting at least 400,000 people in the U.S. and 2.3 million worldwide.

Christina Applegate Reveals Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis

Actress Christina Applegate has announced that she has been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. She survived a breast cancer diagnosis in 2008.

who is Christina Applegate ?

Christina Applegate is an American actress.

(born November 25, 1971)

As a child actress, she gained recognition for starring as Kelly Bundy on the Fox sitcom Married… with Children (1987–1997).

Applegate established a successful film and television career in her adult years, winning a Primetime Emmy Award from seven nominations as well as nominations for four Golden Globe Awards and a Tony Award.

what is Multiple sclerosis ?

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system).

In MS, the immune system attacks the protective sheath (myelin) that covers nerve fibers and causes communication problems between your brain and the rest of your body. Eventually, the disease can cause permanent damage or deterioration of the nerves.

Signs and symptoms of MS vary widely and depend on the amount of nerve damage and which nerves are affected. Some people with severe MS may lose the ability to walk independently or at all, while others may experience long periods of remission without any new symptoms.

There’s no cure for multiple sclerosis. However, treatments can help speed recovery from attacks, modify the course of the disease and manage symptoms.

Is MS curable or treatable?

There’s currently no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS), but it’s possible to treat the symptoms with medicines and other treatments. Treatment for MS depends on the specific symptoms and difficulties the person has. It may include: treating relapses of MS symptoms (with steroid medicine)

Can you live a normal life with MS?

Most people with MS can expect to live as long as people without MS, but the condition can affect their daily life. For some people, the changes will be minor. For others, they can mean a loss of mobility and other functions.

Multiple sclerosis Diagnosis

There are no specific tests for MS. Instead, a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis often relies on ruling out other conditions that might produce similar signs and symptoms, known as a differential diagnosis.

Your doctor is likely to start with a thorough medical history and examination.

Your doctor may then recommend:

Blood tests, to help rule out other diseases with symptoms similar to MS. Tests to check for specific biomarkers associated with MS are currently under development and may also aid in diagnosing the disease.
Spinal tap (lumbar puncture), in which a small sample of cerebrospinal fluid is removed from your spinal canal for laboratory analysis. This sample can show abnormalities in antibodies that are associated with MS. A spinal tap can also help rule out infections and other conditions with symptoms similar to MS.
MRI, which can reveal areas of MS (lesions) on your brain and spinal cord. You may receive an intravenous injection of a contrast material to highlight lesions that indicate your disease is in an active phase.
Evoked potential tests, which record the electrical signals produced by your nervous system in response to stimuli. An evoked potential test may use visual stimuli or electrical stimuli. In these tests, you watch a moving visual pattern, or short electrical impulses are applied to nerves in your legs or arms. Electrodes measure how quickly the information travels down your nerve pathways.

In most people with relapsing-remitting MS, the diagnosis is fairly straightforward and based on a pattern of symptoms consistent with the disease and confirmed by brain imaging scans, such as MRI.

Diagnosing MS can be more difficult in people with unusual symptoms or progressive disease. In these cases, further testing with spinal fluid analysis, evoked potentials and additional imaging may be needed.

who is Selma Blair ?

Selma Blair Beitner (born June 23, 1972), known by her professional name Selma Blair, is an American actress.

She played a number of roles in films and on television before obtaining recognition for her leading role in the film Brown’s Requiem (1998).

Her breakthrough came when she starred as Zoe Bean on the WB sitcom Zoe, Duncan, Jack and Jane (1999–2000), and as Cecile Caldwell in the cult film Cruel Intentions (1999). She continued to find success with the comedies Legally Blonde (2001) and The Sweetest Thing (2002), and achieved international fame with her portrayal of Liz Sherman in the big-budget fantasy films Hellboy (2004) and Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008).

How is Selma Blair doing with her MS?

Blair, who had been left with intense physical pain, told reporters her condition had improved as a result of a stem cell transplant and chemotherapy. “My prognosis is great,” she said. “I’m in remission. Stem cell put me in remission.”

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